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Reflections on the Daily Readings
from the Perspective of Creighton Students

October 1st, 2013
by
John McCoy

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| Email: JohnMcCoy@creighton.edu

The first reading today (Zechariah 8:20-23) really resonates with me. This portion of the passage I think is especially relevant in our current day in age:

“"There shall yet come peoples,
the inhabitants of many cities;
and the inhabitants of one city shall approach those of another,
and say, “Come! let us go to implore the favor of the LORD”;
and, “I too will go to seek the LORD.”

We live in a world rife with conflict - entire regions of the world are becoming engulfed in violence. Regardless of the religious traditions of any area in the world, this passage speaks to the commonalities we have with people throughout the world. People may be troubled and entire populations may be victimized by the overzealous and power-hungry, but we all share the uniqueness that is humanity. 

The passage continues:

“Many peoples and strong nations shall come
to seek the LORD of hosts in Jerusalem
and to implore the favor of the LORD.
Thus says the LORD of hosts:
In those days ten men of every nationality,
speaking different tongues, shall take hold,
yes, take hold of every Jew by the edge of his garment and say,

'Let us go with you, for we have heard that God is with you.'”

Our example, as people who have been blessed with a world void of the violence encompassing other areas of the world, needs to be one that recognizes the uniqueness of the bond of humanity and embrace the positive capabilities and potential we have as an entire human race. It can be easy to respond to violence in kind. The real challenge comes in examining how every person throughout the world shares some innate human quality. If we can show the violent and the victims, the oppressors and the oppressed, that God is with us (and we are with Him), maybe our actions can leave a larger impact than our threats of violence. An example of a faithful, just, life is far more meaningful, in my opinion. While we can never be perfect in our example, always trying to be faithful, fair, and loving will surely help the world reach its potential.

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