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Daily Reflections


It is a great mid-Lent gospel for us. However our Lenten journey has gone so far, we can ask ourselves how we are doing in letting our lives be shaped by the heart of Jesus. And, when we discover any remaining resistance to being changed, we can ask for the grace to spend time this week letting ourselves be reminded that this is the way Jesus loves us. He doesn't give up on us. He doesn't judge us. He knows us through and through, being with us every day, in every moment of our lives. And, he loves us.

Wednesday of the Third Week of Lent


Yet when the servant does not learn from the king's liberality but does violence to another servant who is in a situation similar to what he himself had been in, the king does not treat him as the Prodigal Son's father would. This man has not learned, has not imitated either the king or the Prodigal Son, and so one would think that he richly merits to receive what the king had tried to help him to avoid.

The application of this parable to us is clear, then, but have we ourselves really learned to be generous in our goods and even more in our forgiving and in building others up?

Tuesday of the Third Week of Lent




Christ has no body now but yours. No hands, no feet on earth but yours. Yours are the eyes through which he looks compassion on this world. Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good. Yours are the hands through which he blesses all the world. Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the eyes, you are his body. Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

Monday of the Third Week of Lent

 

 

 




It’s the Third Sunday of Lent – halfway through.  For many of us, it’s hard to admit that this Lent is not all we had hoped for.  On Ash Wednesday, we intended to make some changes in our lives.  And yet halfway through Lent, we are disappointed in ourselves. 

Jesus “gets” us.  He understands our hearts and he knows that our instinct is to give up on the tree that bears no fruit.  To give up on our Lent halfway through.  Today Jesus tell us not to give up hope that we can be better.  He offers us his love, care and his help.

Third Sunday of Lent

 

 




No matter how worn, torn, or tattered we become Jesus will always be by our side. Conversely, no matter how sick or injured my little guy was, Lamby never left his side.  He provided comfort…and still does! 

Take some time today to think about times when you felt worn, torn or tattered, and reflect on how Jesus was present during those times.  Did you realize He was present at the time?  Did you pray for him to reveal his presence?  Do you now understand his eternal presence?

Saturday of the Second Week of Lent


Rather than what I am giving up, this season I trying to concentrate on moving in new directions that will leave me better when Easter arrives. In today’s reading we see Joseph’s brothers and the religious leaders in the Gospel feeling confident in their misguided judgements. I know how often I judge and wonder how much it is due to my sources of information and to those who are around me. My Lenten task is to judge less and to seek to understand more.

Friday of the Second Week of Lent


Lent provides a stark reminder of Jesus’ agape love for us.  Considering this astonishing gift of salvation, it would seem impossible to understand how we, or anyone else for that matter, could walk away from God.  During Lent, we are called to self-examination and reflection.  That calling is certainly challenging.  Have we walked away from Jesus?  Are we living our lives centrally focused upon Him?  Could we, or should we be doing something more to point our world to our Savior? 

Thursday of the Second Week of Lent


“This is not mine to give,” he said.  “My Father has prepared those places.” I remember reading for the first time in this passage Jesus stating that this favor was “not mine to give.” Jesus held himself subservient to his Father.  It was a turning point for me.  I felt that we too must take this example to heart.  If we want to be exalted in the Kingdom of God, we must be servants. Jesus, himself, came to serve, not to be served.

Wednesday of the Second Week of Lent

 


Joseph had cultivated a deep relationship with God throughout his life and was open to receive God’s gift of being the person who would help educate Jesus, the Messiah. In this relationship, Joseph was not in control and this was fine because he trusted the One in control. He knew the Law given by God to God’s people, he was faithful to it, yet he was open to God’s surprise.

During this remaining Lent season and the coming Easter season, let’s pray for an open and trusting heart. Let’s pray for the courage to receive God’s gifts openheartedly and with gratitude the way Joseph did.

Solemnity of Saint Joseph, spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary


Today's Gospel Reading is from the one chapter of Luke's account of the Sermon and the Beatitudes. Be compassionate as your Heavenly Father is compassionate. Well now that's a tough one, but possible, sometimes. We are also urged not to judge or condemn.

Our senses and intellects and wills are set up exactly to perceive, process by judging and select what is good and what is not so. One of the dangerous things of Lent is precisely to take in our personal data, judge ourselves and, kind-of, condemn ourselves. Now that's not exactly Lenten prayer.

Monday of the Second Week of Lent


St. Patrick was a model for those who would come after him in the faith.

In his Confession, he mentions twelve near-death experiences. He endured insults, persecution, imprisonment, and slander. Before he died, his character was questioned; he is motivated by greed, they said. Yet, if you want to know what it looks like to trust in God, look at St. Patrick.

Finally, the story of the transfiguration of Jesus sheds light on why St. Patrick was so successful. The voice from the cloud told the disciples, "This is my chosen Son; listen to him." This is what St. Patrick did; in the midst of criticism, slander, and hate - he listened to Jesus.

Second Sunday of Lent



As we move on through Lent, we prepare ourselves to celebrate redemption offered to bad and good... to just and unjust. But redemption as offered remains incomplete, until it is freely accepted by us, an acceptance that presupposes a recognition of our needing such redemption. Although Paul writes: in my flesh I am filling up what is lacking in the afflictions of Christ [Col. 1: 24], it should be clear that on Christ’s side nothing is lacking in his suffering. Yet something is lacking on our side, namely, our acceptance of that redeeming suffering. Lent urges us to recognize our daily need for fuller acceptance of that redemption already offered.

Saturday of the First Week of Lent


Today we read about second chances. We are not held to our past or our past decisions forever. We can change. If we've made a mistake, we can make it right and move forward in a positive direction. In fact, if we have made a mistake, if we are heading in the wrong direction, we should fix it.
In our first reading from Ezekiel,

God says that the wicked should turn away from sin and do what is right and just. Just because one has previously made a mistake does not make that person a mistake. There are second chances in life. God will acknowledge our conversion and react accordingly. But the opposite is true too.

Friday of the First Week of Lent




Great fear flattens us. We can hardly breathe or move. Our limbs drop like bricks. Dread engulfs us. What was solid dissolves. No ground remains to stand upon. We fall into emptiness. No one is there to catch us. We are abandoned.

The Gospel tells us to fear not. Do not be afraid. That isn't easy. Uneasiness and ambiguity creep in. Where is the firm ground to stand on? When our familiar world dissolves into fear, we plead: God, I need you. I am undone. We cry from the heart.

Like Esther, we pray to the God of Abraham. And we sing: "When I was in trouble, Jesus lifted me."

Thursday of the First Week of Lent


...the king listened and directed all his people to repent and turn from their evil ways and violence.  He recognized the need for them to honestly be sorry for their actions and ask for mercy and forgiveness.  There was no guarantee but he proposed,

Who knows, God may relent and forgive, and withhold his blazing wrath,
so that we shall not perish.

The reading tells us that when God saw that by their actions how they turned from their evil way, He was merciful and did not destroy the city after all.  It is important to note that it was not just words but real actions that testified to their turning from evil.  It really made me think about the times I say I will do something differently, that I will be less judgmental or that I will be kinder to those who are not so nice to me.  Yet, are my actions in line with my words?

Wednesday of the First Week of Lent


Loving God,
In becoming human in and through Jesus, you became our Companion and Guide. Jesus gave us the words of this prayer we say every time we gather with community at Your sacred table, words we utter when we are in need and have no other words, words many of us can say without consciously thinking them because it is one of the earliest prayers we learn. These words are comforting. These words are challenging. These words remind us how to be in relationship with you.

Loving Companion,
May we remember that when we say Your name, whatever we may call You – Father, Mother, Sister, Friend, Creator, Light – we are calling your holiness among us. May Your name always be sacred utterances from our tongues.

Tuesday of the First Week of Lent


God’s love is my only assurance.  Pure Love knows when I wander off and comes looking for me.  Love sits next to me joining in my laughter and tears.  Love looks at me and loves me before I accept love, repent, and join in the work of the sheep.  On the day of judgement, standing in front of Pure Love, if I find myself among the goats I hope I will not try to rationalize when I did not see Jesus.  Rather, I hope I come to my senses and ask forgiveness.  I have this same hope for any other goats standing around me.  I trust that Pure Love will then invite us into the celebration. 

Monday of the First Week of Lent

 

 

 

 

 

 


We may see in the specific temptations which Jesus undergoes a battle with temptations to which every human heart is vulnerable: “Turn these stones into bread” – the temptation to live only “on bread alone,” to live as though material things are the only source of life.  “I shall give you all this power and glory” – the temptation to amass reputation and wealth as false gods in an attempt to escape human vulnerability. “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down . . .” – the very subtle temptation for believers:  to presume no responsibility for our actions, since “God will take care of everything.” 

First Sunday of Lent

 

 

Weekly Guide


The day ahead will shape what we ask for as our feet hit the floor in the morning. Pausing to thank the Lord for this day and to ask for the grace to let our mind and heart be renewed in the concrete circumstances, relationships and obligations of our day. Throughout the day, we can then return to those desires in background of our awareness. Our request for the Lord's help is always there and our consciousness of it will help us make the choice we desire to make, to let go of what we need to let go of, to add what we need to add.

Third Week of Lent


This is all preparing us for a deeper conversion, a readiness for reconciliation with God and the graces that will allow us to be a source of reconciliation with others. This is the time when we begin to see and experience how much God loves us at a new and more personal level. These graces prepare us to keep our eyes focused on Jesus in the weeks ahead - to learn from him, to fall in love with him more deeply and to be drawn to imitate him more completely. If we are just getting started with our Lenten journey, renewing our desires for these graces will be all we need to begin with a renewed openness. God does not need a lot of time to convince us of his love for us.

Third Week of Lent



This is a pivotal week of Lent. We can solidify the patterns we have begun or we can make a new start, if we haven't been able to get started yet. If we have begun to recognize what needs realigning in our lives and have begun to fast and abstain from some things that get in the way of our relationship with the Lord, then we are engaging in a struggle. We are likely uncovering resistance and experiencing our personal sinfulness face-to-face.

Third Week of Lent

 

 




Third Sunday of Lent offers Moses' encounter with God in the burning bush. The Lord promises Moses that he will lead the captive Israelites out of Egypt and into “a land flowing with milk and honey.” Luke's Gospel tells us of Jesus' warning that we must be willing to repent now and that our lives could end by accident or through the evil of someone else. The parable of the barren fig tree reminds us of God's patient love for us, even when we show no signs of changing our lives.

Third Week of Lent

 

 

 

 



Third Sunday of Lent offers Moses' encounter with God in the burning bush. The Lord promises Moses that he will lead the captive Israelites out of Egypt and into "a land flowing with milk and honey." Luke's Gospel tells us of Jesus' warning that we must be willing to repent now and that our lives could end by accident or through the evil of someone else. The parable of the barren fig tree reminds us of God's patient love for us, even when we show no signs of changing our lives. In most parishes, there will be one Liturgy for the RCIA candidates, using the Gospel of the Woman at the Well.

Second Week of Lent


Each of us will be able to grow in our ability to have brief conversations with our Lord. Whether driving or shopping, doing laundry or paying bills, working in our office or walking down the hall to the bathroom, we can use brief “background” moments to connect with our Lord. These moments of “contemplation in action” will give a character and shape to our day. Lent becomes a living reality for us when our days are spent with the Lord, listening to his love for us, calling us to gratitude and freedom.

Second Week of Lent


Help to soften my heart to hear your love. I need your healing, Lord.” Or we might get even more concrete, “Lord, Pat is such a struggle for me. Help me to remember how much you love me when I see Pat today. And, when I'm tempted to be impatient or angry, just help me pause and give that over to you, in gratitude for your love.”

Second Week of Lent

 

 



This can all be part of the background of our busy, daily life. Each morning, when our feet hit the floor, if only for a few moments, we can ask for a simple grace. At first, it might only be, “Dear Lord, help me today.” As we brush our teeth, wash and get dressed we might specify our prayer more: “Dear Lord, give me the grace to recognize my impatience, anger and judgment today. Help to soften my heart to hear your love. I need your healing, Lord.”

Second Week of Lent


It is good to begin by being reminded that God is rich in mercy to us and that we should therefore be merciful to others. It is great to remember that exalting ourselves is dangerous and that there will be consequences for our mistreatment of the poor. We are like tenants of our Father's gifts to us. We can ask ourselves if we use them gratefully and return the fruits that our Lord desires, or do we reject the prophetic words that come to us? Do we reject Jesus himself?

Second Week of Lent

 


 


The second week begins with Jesus telling us: "Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful. .. For the measure with which you measure will in return be measured out to you." All week we will be taught by Jesus about the simple lessons of being his followers. "Whoever exalts himself will be humbled; but whoever humbles himself will be exalted."

During this second week of Lent we continue to try to make use of more reflective time each day. We are using all the resources available to us to practice new habits and patterns. We are still in the beginning stages of that process, so we shouldn't be discouraged if it takes more practice.

Second Week of Lent


For the Second Sunday of Lent we read of how God made a covenant with Abraham. In Luke's gospel we witness how Jesus showed his disciples his glory, to prepare them for what is to come. A voice from a cloud said, “This is my chosen Son; listen to him.” All we need to do for the journey ahead is to listen to him.

Second Week of Lent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Jesus says our holiness has to go beyond the letter-of-the-law holiness; it must touch our anger, our judgments of others, and be reconciled with those we've wronged. The holiness Jesus proposes for us calls us to love our enemies, even to pray for those who persecute us. We are called to love the way God does.

For the Second Sunday of Lent we read of how God made a covenant with Abraham. In Luke's gospel we witness how Jesus showed his disciples his glory, to prepare them for what is to come. A voice from a cloud said, “This is my chosen Son; listen to him.” All we need to do for the journey ahead is to listen to him.

The First Week of Lent


This first week of Lent is the time we are given to begin our Lenten patterns, to re-align our priorities, and to make use of more reflective time each day. It is a time to fast and abstain from those things that hinder our relationship with the Lord, and to consider being more generous to the poor.

As we make this beginning, we are offered some beautiful instruction about what is expected of us. These readings describe a very Jesus-like love. We can examine our care for the hungry, thirsty, naked, sick or imprisoned. We can reflect upon who in our lives needs us and whether we love them as we want to be loved. And we can look at the deeper things, like our anger or how we treat others, and our response to those who are our “enemies.”

The First Week of Lent


It is in the particular events of our day that we will become attentive to our need for our Lord's presence and grace, as well as our need to choose a new pattern. Each evening, we can briefly review the day and recognize some missed opportunities to connect with the Lord or take advantage of a situation here or there, but most of all, we can thank the Lord for the moments of connection that have begun our Lenten journey.

The First Week of Lent

 

 





Each morning this week we can ask our Lord to help us focus this day on the neediest people around us. We can ask to begin new patterns this week by practicing special charity and love, where I haven't been so generous or kind before. The key is to ask and to be very specific. Then, throughout the day, we can keep talking with our Lord, in the “background” about these graces we ask for and the concrete circumstances we find ourselves in.

The First Week of Lent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


As we make this beginning, we are offered some beautiful instruction about what is expected of us. These readings describe a very Jesus-like love. We can examine our care for the hungry, thirsty, naked, sick or imprisoned. We can reflect upon who in our lives needs us and whether we love them as we want to be loved. And we can look at the deeper things, like our anger or how we treat others, and our response to those who are our “enemies.” What is most important this first week, beyond a sharper examination of our consciences, is to see this as a time for God's grace to work in us. So, it is a time to ask for the graces we are starting to see we need.

The First Week of Lent

 




After last week's first four days, the next three weeks of Lent represent a period of instruction, originally designed for the Catechumens (those preparing for Baptism at the Easter Vigil). We can read these readings as a catechism of renewal for us all.

The first weekday reading of week one is the great giving of the Commandments: “Be holy, for I, the LORD, your God, am holy.” Jesus gives the great parable about the last judgment - separating the charitable from the uncharitable: “whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.”

The First Week of Lent

 

 

 

 

 


This first week of Lent is the time we are given to begin our Lenten patterns, to re-align our priorities, and to make use of more reflective time each day. It is a time to fast and abstain from those things that hinder our relationship with the Lord, and to consider being more generous to the poor.

The First Sunday of Lent

 

 

 

 

 





 




Pope Francis


He invited the international community to provide financing for long-term water projects in places where it is lacking.

These efforts, he said, will help overcome “the vision of turning water into a mere commodity, exclusively regulated by market forces.”

“The underprivileged of the earth challenge us to remedy the lack of water in their countries,” the Pope said. “They also challenge us, from their misery and limits, to recognize the value that this indispensable good deserves for the development of all peoples.”

World Water Day urges defense of water access

 


Pope Francis concluded his catechesis saying that on the time of Lent, the Lord invites us to conversion.

“Each of us”, he said, “must feel challenged by this call, correcting something in our lives, in our way of thinking, acting and living our relationships with our brothers and sisters”.

At the same time, he added, we must imitate the patience of God who has confidence in the ability of all to “rise up” and resume their journey. He does not extinguish the weak flame, but accompanies and cares for those who are weak so that they may strengthen themselves and bring their contribution of love to the community.

‘don’t take advantage of God’s patience’

“Here are welcomed those who suffer in body and spirit, and our Mother brings to all the mercy of the Lord from generation to generation.”

The Holy Father said illness wounds the family, but that the family must welcome the sick person by loving, supporting, encouraging, and caring for them.

And the Pope sent his thoughts and prayers to people around the world who suffer from various illnesses and maladies. “Your suffering can become a decisive collaboration for the coming of the Kingdom of God,” he said.

Mary’s House a home for youth, families, sick


The Pope encouraged those present to go ahead with their mission to help young people travel with their eyes open to the world, with their hands holding other hands, with their hearts open to the frailty of their brothers and sisters.

The Pope also asked the young members of the Tourism Centre to be travel companions for those who have lost hope, are incapable of dreaming and are demotivated in the face of the future.

He told them to help others “fly high”, pointing out that young people who seem content with just surviving are not really living their lives. “It’s as if they have already retired”, he said.

Help others open their eyes to the world

God’s desire for the salvation of human beings, and of the whole world, means that our prayer that His will be done does not mean “bowing our heads”, like slaves, to an unalterable fate. On the contrary, “God wants us to be free,” the Pope said; and “it is His love that frees us”. “Thy will be done”, he said, is “a courageous, even combative prayer” precisely because there is so much evil in the world, which is not according to God’s [antecedent] will.

God seeks each one of us personally

 

 


“We have seen how in these days young people from different cities of the world have taken to the streets to defend the environment, to defend the earth. The young have an unimaginable power, they are creative”, Pope Francis said. He insisted on the need to embrace their creativity, and not to “domesticate” them. Young people “are not the future”, he said. “They are the present, the today, the ‘now’ of God. We must correct this expression”.

Young people are the “now” of God

Pope Francis concluded, “the work you do is a real mission, involving both the mind and the heart…” He added, “You bear Christian witness, because you seek to practice the values of the Gospel and your sense of belonging to the Church; but also because of the breadth of your gaze, your ability to imagine the right social context and health care system for the future, and your desire to serve, with humility and competence, every person entrusted to you.”

Ensure equal access to healthcare

The Lord teaches us: “Give and it will be given to you”: be generous in giving. Don’t be “closed pockets”; be generous in giving to the poor, to those who are in need, and also in giving many things: in giving counsel, in giving a smile to people, in smiling. “Give and it will be given to you. And it will be given to you in good measure, flowing over, pressed down, running over”, because the Lord will be generous: We give one, and He gives us one hundred of all that we have given.

Imitate the mercy of the Lord

Pope Francis encourages members of the Court of Auditors to pursue their duties “with serenity and seriousness”, whilst always being motivated by the knowledge that they are rendering a service - with an aim to helping culture and legality grow within society.

He urges them to use Lent as a time to see Christ as a “witness of truth and justice”, as His Word is an “inextinguishable source of motivation to all those who dedicate themselves to the service of the common good.”

May Christ motivate you to serve for the Common Good

 

 


The Pope concluded his homily inviting the faithful to rediscover the beauty of simplicity, of reality that "must be one with appearance" during this time of Lent.

"Ask the Lord for strength and go forward with humility, doing what you can. But don't put make-up on your soul, because the Lord won't recognize you. Let us ask the Lord for the grace to be consistent, not to be vain, not to want to appear more worthy than we are. Let us ask for this grace, during this Lent: the coherence between formality and the reality, between who we are and how we want to appear".

Lent is an opportunity to be simple and true


Following the attack, the Catholic Bishops of New Zealand addressed a message to members of the Muslim community in New Zealand:

“We hold you in prayer as we hear the terrible news of violence against Muslims in mosques in Christchurch. We are profoundly aware of the positive relationships we have with Islamic people in this land, and we are particularly horrified that this has happened at a place and time of prayer. We are deeply saddened that people have been killed and injured, and our hearts go out to them, their families and wider community. We wish you to be aware of our solidarity with you in the face of such violence.”

New Zealand: "Absolutely devasted" after unprecedented attacks on mosques


In the face of the “scandals that seem to have no end, and which disfigure the face of the Bride of Christ”, Cardinal Becciu said, “We need priests, consecrated persons, generous shepherds, like these martyrs of Oviedo. We need honest and irreproachable priests who bring souls to God, and who do not cause suffering to the Church, or disturbance to the people of God”.

The newly beatified martyrs, he said, “with their message and martyrdom, speak to us and remind us that, although dying for the faith is a gift given only to some, living the faith is a call addressed to all”.

Martyred seminarians followed Christ's Way of the Cross



Pakistan and its young people are no exception to the revolution of the smartphones sweeping across the globe.

Archbishop Shaw wants to warn young people against developing an addiction to the smartphone, like drugs. He lamented that "young people keep sending messages even while they are praying."

Instead, he said they should use Lent to analyze their life and give up habits and behaviours that distance them from others. "Be firm in the face of temptation," he urged.

Pakistani bishop urges smartphone fasting during Lent

 

 

 


God’s dream, the retreat preacher pointed out, has already had admirable achievements in past centuries and it will have even more admirable achievements in the course of future centuries.   This is because the design of the Holy Spirit never remains a distant and ineffective model or an ideal but works in the lives of men as a “transfiguring yeast”.

God lives among the citizens promoting solidarity, brotherhood, the desire for goodness, truth and justice, Abbot Gianni said,  adding that He does not hide Himself from those who seek Him with a sincere heart.

Cities as spaces for reconciliation, peace and encounter


All these temptations, the Pope said, are really “illusions” that promise “success and happiness”, but in reality “are all completely foreign to God’s way of acting”. In fact, he said, “they actually separate us from God, because they are the work of Satan”.

Jesus overcomes these three temptations by personally facing them, “in order fully to adhere to the Father’s plan”. In doing so, Pope Francis said, Jesus shows us the remedies for temptations – namely, “the interior life, faith in God, the certainty of His love.” With the certainty that God is Father, and that He loves us, "we will overcome every temptation".

So, Pope Francis said in conclusion, “let us take advantage of Lent, as a privileged time to purify ourselves, in order to experience the consoling presence of God in our life”.

Jesus shows us the remedies for temptation

 


The abbot spoke about the need to gaze from above in order not to fall into the temptation of the evil one who would almost have us own, dominate and condition the things of this world.   On the contrary, he said, one needs to have a gaze aroused by the Holy Spirit and the Word of the Lord - a gaze of contemplation, of gratitude, of vigilance if necessary and of prophecy.   It is a gaze that easily recognizes that our cities are a desert.

The abbot recalled the words of St. Augustine - "If you are not attentive to your heart, you will never know if Jesus is visiting you or not" – and stressed on the conversion of the heart so that it recognizes the presence of God in our history and opens itself to a burning hope that is new and unheard of.

Caring for the heart to recognize God's presences


Idolatry is an attitude of the heart, when you prefer to do something because it is more comfortable for me, instead of the Lord – precisely because we have forgotten the Lord. At the beginning of Lent, it would be good for all of us to ask for the grace to preserve memory, to preserve the memory of everything the Lord has done in my life: how he loved me so much, how he loved me. And from that memory, to go forward. And it would also do us good continually to repeat the advice of Paul to Timothy, his beloved disciple: “Remember Jesus Christ, risen from the dead”. I repeat: “Remember Jesus Christ, risen from the dead”. Remember Jesus, Jesus who has accompanied me up to now, and will accompany me until the moment when I must appear before Him in glory. May the Lord give us the grace to preserve memory”.

Preserve the memory of what the Lord has done

The Pope concluded his homily inviting the faithful to rediscover the beauty of simplicity, of reality that “must be one with appearance” during this time of Lent.

“Ask the Lord for strength and go forward with humility, doing what you can. But don't put make-up on your soul, because the Lord won't recognize you. Let us ask the Lord for the grace to be consistent, not to be vain, not to want to appear more worthy than we are. Let us ask for this grace, during this Lent: the coherence between formality and the reality, between who we are and how we want to appear”.

Lent is an opportunity to be simple and true

 

 

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